Bellaterra Journal of Teaching & Learning Language & Literature https://revistes.uab.cat/jtl3 <p><strong><em>Bellaterra Journal of Teaching &amp; Learning Language &amp; Literature</em></strong> is an online peer-reviewed, multilingual academic journal with a focus on language and literature teaching methods. We publish outstanding research in these areas, written by graduate students or post-doctoral students, as well as invited contributions by internationally known scholars.</p><strong></strong> Departament de Didàctica de la Llengua, de la Literatura i de les Ciències Socials en-US Bellaterra Journal of Teaching & Learning Language & Literature 2013-6196 <p>By submitting a manuscripts, the author confirms that they are sole authors of the work, that it is original work and that the text does not contain any illegal content or anything that infringes author or other's rights. <strong>All authors are required to sign a copyright form before their article will be published, indicating that they have followed the ethics statement.</strong> Copyright clearance for reproduction of any figures, diagrams or charts from published works is sole responsibility of the author.</p><strong></strong> Young people confronting the challenge of reading and interpreting a digital world https://revistes.uab.cat/jtl3/article/view/v14-n2-castellvi-tosar-santisteban <p>Critical citizenship education must consider the global and digital context in which we live. Digital media and global processes have a decisive influence on people’s daily lives. However, digital literacy programs rarely go beyond teaching technological skills. Similarly, critical thinking approaches to education focus on developing cognitive skills, omitting the weight of values and emotions in decision making. This research analyses Spanish secondary school students’ narratives and reflections about two publications on Twitter that present biased information to encourage undemocratic attitudes. The results show that most students are far from being critical of the information they read on the internet, and they easily fall into the trap of defending undemocratic discourses.</p> Jordi Castellví Mata Breogán Tosar Bacarizo Antoni Santisteban Fernández Copyright (c) 2021 Bellaterra Journal of Teaching & Learning Language & Literature https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2021-07-20 2021-07-20 14 2 e905 e905 10.5565/rev/jtl3.905 Invisibles and global citizenship in secondary education teacher training https://revistes.uab.cat/jtl3/article/view/v14-n2-ballbe-gonzalez-ortega <p>The aim of this study is to analyze what future Secondary Education teachers think (<em>n</em> = 61) and how they reflect on controversial social problems and conflicts affecting local/global issues, rethinking historical time, geographical space and social interrelations in the world. It was a mixed method research study. The information was obtained through a questionnaire that proposed the analysis of a controversial issue. The information analysis was done following the methodological principles of quantitative content analysis. The results show that future teachers do not reach a satisfactory critical level of literacy, a circumstance that underlines the need for spaces for teaching and discussion about controversial issues with a global significance.</p> Maria Ballbé Martínez Gustavo González Valencia Delfín Ortega Sánchez Copyright (c) 2021 Bellaterra Journal of Teaching & Learning Language & Literature https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2021-07-20 2021-07-20 14 2 e910 e910 10.5565/rev/jtl3.910 Against Hate: hate speeches on digital contexts and alternative counter narratives on Secondary Education students https://revistes.uab.cat/jtl3/article/view/v14-n2-massip-garcia-gonzalez <p>Hate speech are created against people and communities. They generate discrimination from the stigma, generalisation and exclusion of social coexistence. In the digital era, education is important to train critical citizenry able to counter online hate speech. The present study analyses the critical competences of 307 student of Secondary Education, facing hate speech in social media debates. The results show a general rejection to racist and discriminatory contents. Nevertheless, counter narratives based on strong arguments are not usual. On the other hand, a minority of the students are in agreement with these discriminatory discourses.</p> Mariona Massip Sabater Carmen Rosa García-Ruiz Neus González-Monfort Copyright (c) 2021 Bellaterra Journal of Teaching & Learning Language & Literature https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2021-07-20 2021-07-20 14 2 e909 e909 10.5565/rev/jtl3.909 Read the world to write the future: An interview with professors E Wayne Ross and Xosé Manuel Souto, experts in critical social studies https://revistes.uab.cat/jtl3/article/view/v14-n2-castellvi-mata <p>E Wayne Ross is professor at the University of British Columbia (Canada). He is interested in the influence of social and institutional contexts on teachers’ practice as well as the role of curriculum and teaching in building a democratic society in the face of antidemocratic impulses of greed, individualism, and intolerance.</p> <p>Xosé Manuel Souto is professor at the University of Valencia (Spain), in the department of social and experimental sciences education. He directs the Gea-Clío educational innovation group that has developed, for the past thirty years, its work in the fields of teacher training, creation of curricular material and educational research.</p> Jordi Castellví Mata Copyright (c) 2021 Bellaterra Journal of Teaching & Learning Language & Literature https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2021-07-20 2021-07-20 14 2 e974 e974 10.5565/rev/jtl3.974 Book review. Handbook of Research on Citizenship and Heritage Education, por Emilio José Delgado Algarra y José María Cuenca López (Coords.) https://revistes.uab.cat/jtl3/article/view/v14-n2-abril Daniel Abril-López Copyright (c) 2021 Bellaterra Journal of Teaching & Learning Language & Literature https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2021-07-20 2021-07-20 14 2 e892 e892 10.5565/rev/jtl3.892 Reading the world through the educational curriculum: The Social Sciences curriculum in Brazil in the context of the rise of conservatism https://revistes.uab.cat/jtl3/article/view/v14-n2-oliveira <p>In Brazil, the growing political polarization that culminated in the election of Jair Bolsonaro in 2018 consolidated a shift in educational policy that had already been pointed out in previous years, as demonstrated by the Nonpartisan school movement performance. In this article, we analyze the curriculum of human and social sciences in secondary education in Brazil from the Brazilian Learning Standards, and how that document reflects the rise of these conservative movements. On the one hand, it was observed that important categories for the social sciences, such as gender, were removed, thus removing the centrality of categories such as racism and social inequalities; on the other hand, there is a strong dispute over the meanings of other concepts, such as human rights. Both actions converge to fine-tune the human and social sciences curriculum with the guidelines of conservative movements in the educational field.</p> Amurabi Oliveira Copyright (c) 2021 Bellaterra Journal of Teaching & Learning Language & Literature https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2021-07-20 2021-07-20 14 2 e948 e948 10.5565/rev/jtl3.948 Editor’s note: Read the world to write the future: critical education to address contemporary issues https://revistes.uab.cat/jtl3/article/view/v14-n2-castellvi-mata1 <p>Social sciences education and language and literature education are bonded by a strong link that goes back to the origins of both areas. The development of critical thinking and critical literacy has been -and continues to be- one of the key elements of these research lines. Both have always had on the horizon a global, reflective, and critical citizenship education, capable of dismantling hate narratives present in the media and on social networks by reading beyond the lines and the sources of information, analyzing texts, images, videos, and other cultural products in order to identify ideologies and be able to understand and face past and current social issues, projecting themselves into the future</p> Jordi Castellví Mata Copyright (c) 2021 Bellaterra Journal of Teaching & Learning Language & Literature https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2021-07-20 2021-07-20 14 2 e982 e982 10.5565/rev/jtl3.982